Part 1

 

When recruiting physicians for any practice opportunity, it is crucial for physician recruiters to thoroughly screen candidates. Whether it’s trying to spot red flags, checking for cultural fit, or screening for emotional intelligence, they are some key screening questions that will give recruiters valuable insight into a candidate.

 

In the first part, we will cover questions that will help inform you if the candidate is a good fit for your practice, and who else you may need to woo to get them there. Below are the first 3 questions that you might not be asking your physician candidate’s – but probably should.

 

Is there anything you don’t want to be doing?

 

A candidate will likely tell you what their ideal practice opportunity looks like, but they may not be as forthcoming regarding what would be a deal breaker. Are they a Family Practitioner that doesn’t want to see very young patients? Or perhaps they’re an Internist who doesn’t want to see many geriatric patients. Depending on the specifics of your opportunity, these deal breakers on the side of a candidate can easily take them out of the running.

 

 

Is there anyone you need to take into consideration during your search?

 

This question often serves to inform the recruiter of a candidate’s spouse and/or children, giving the physician recruiter an opening to ask if there are any community features that would be nice or even necessary for the candidate and their family should they chose to relocate to your town. By providing the candidate with information on things such as schools, career opportunities for the spouse, and recreational activities that would fit with the family’s lifestyle, a recruiter can woo the family and ensure that the candidate choses to relocate and make your town their home.

Do you have any special interests

 

Most physicians have special interests or areas of practice that they particularly enjoy. Whether it is a Primary Care Provider that enjoys Women’s Health or a Geriatrician that finds an interest in Palliative Medicine, a physician candidate’s special interests can help a recruiter identify if the candidate would be a good addition to a group. By having special interests that complement those of existing physicians, or having interests that would allow the practice to grow in scope, a prospective candidate’s special interests can have a significant impact on their candidacy.

 

Conclusion:

Thoroughly screening candidates is crucial to any recruitment effort. But a thorough screening is about more than getting a general idea of what a candidate is looking for. Screening a candidate for clinical and cultural fit as well as finding out influencing factors are all part of a thorough screening.

Key Take Aways:

  • Find out what the deal breakers are
  • Get to know a candidate’s clinical passions
  • Find out if they have anyone influencing their decision – and find out how to win them over